Back Pain as a Result of Heavy Labor

Almost everyone has had problems with back pain at some point in their life. There is both muscles, ligaments, and joints in the back that can be the cause for pain, but what is behind every injury related to the back is not yet fully determined.

toa heftiba 578093 unsplash 200x300 Back Pain as a Result of Heavy Labor
Photo by Toa Heftiba on Unsplash

A lot of people that develops chronic back pain without getting a proper back diagnosis might be exposed to heavy physical labor or other factors that affect the work environment. The personal ability to cope with the pain is a huge factor in the experiencing of pain.

When the back pain starts affecting your way you move your body, the unnatural movements can very well be the cause for even more pain in areas that are not as accustomed to working with the extra tension.

The most important thing is to remain active but under steady and professional supervision.

After all, the back is built to deal with constant pressure. We use it in every motion. A more active bod lets the blood flow through the back and as most of us know, the blood is the delivery-man of both oxygen and other types of nutritional substances to the body’s different organs.

Repetitive work, however, is not as natural as constantly activating the whole body – and this is where a lot of people that deals with repetitive tasks start developing a chronic back problem.

A fatigued body won’t be able to assist the back enough, resulting in a higher risk of sudden back injuries.

Resting is the worst thing you can do for your back pain. You CANNOT rest yourself free from pain. However, as mentioned above, a controlled and monitored activation of the body is the best way to go.

Even as we age, the body gets more exposed to back injuries, this is also due to lack of blood flow and weakening of joints. There are a lot of devices that help with blood flow, including massage chairs, back massager cushions, and even acupressure mats are great for helping the body to keep everything as replenished as possible.

Lower back pain is also something common to a hard worker. The best thing in dealing with lower back pain is to keep active with the help and support of a back/lumbar brace as a way to keep letting the blood flow help with any type of recovery the body deems fit.

Help your body and your back by following these simple rules:

  • To avoid any trouble, the core thing is to alternate your working habits and position.
    You should rest and stretch, and if you’re working in colder environments, it’s important to not start working with heavy lifting and alike before really getting warmed up to do so.  It’s also crucial to get to the source of any existing back pain in order to not have it reoccurring.
    I talk about this a lot in both my e-book the intellectual posture and in my article about how the mind can help and prevent back pain.
  • Stop before it starts hurting.
    It can be hard because the body can be a bit slow in sending any pain-related signals to the brain. A good idea is to clock how long you can do a specific task and use your phones alarm clock so that you know beforehand how long you should be working at that task.
  • Keep up with strength and condition training.
    You should not underestimate this. Even though you have a demanding and physical job, going to the gym 3 times a week will actually help you with any physical fatigue rather than lowering it.
  • Try to get a specific training going
    If there are any parts of your body that you feel needs it the most, you can contact a physical therapist to get any advice on how to find something that will benefit you.

 

Post Author: Adam Axelsson

I am a 26-year-old student that has a bachelors degree in Kinesiology, a Certified Strength, and Conditioning Specialist and currently studying the Ph.D. Physical Therapy program. My main focuses have been on back-related issues and I love to share my strong passion for how the human body works!

I am a 26-year-old student that has a bachelors degree in Kinesiology, a Certified Strength, and Conditioning Specialist and currently studying the Ph.D. Physical Therapy program.

My main focuses have been on back-related issues and I love to share my strong passion for how the human body works!